Gwynne calls for Britain to get a Pay Rise

moneymoneymoneyDenton and Reddish MP, Andrew Gwynne, has joined calls from the Labour Party for a change in approach towards wages, arguing that Britain needs a pay rise.

High wages can drive high productivity; but under the Conservative Government, wages across the North West fell by 0.8% per year in real terms compared to a rise of 1% from 2002 to 2010, the last period of Labour in government.

The Tories have presided over a crisis of low pay and stagnating wages that has seen workers’ real wages still lower than where they were in 2010 and over a million workers being held back on zero-hours contracts.  In 2014, six million people earned less than the living wage, with four million children living in poverty, two-thirds of them in households in which at least one parent works.

Labour believes in a full and proper wage for a working day, which is why the party have committed to introducing a statutory real Living Wage, expected to be £10 per hour by 2020. The wage would be set by an independent Living Wage Review Body using the same methodology as the current voluntary living wage.

Andrew Gwynne said:

“It is a sign of this Tory Government’s complete economic failure that productivity and real wages are today lower than they were in 2007.

“The evidence is clear, Britain will only succeed in the advanced global marketplace as a high-wage, high-productivity, high-quality country, and we can only achieve that with Labour in government.

“Labour plans to take measures to boost wages, including the £10 an hour minimum wage by 2020.”

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